Category Archives: Press Release

Press Release: Archive

“Community Development,” 1:1 (2003)

“Civil Rights,” 2:1 (2004)

“Voting,” 2:2 (2004)

“Health,” 3:1 (2005)

“Employment/Work Issues,” 3:2 (2005)

“Glass Ceiling/Health Issues,” 4:1 (2006)

“Youth,” 4:2 (2006)

“Art & Cultural Institutions,” 5:1 (2007)

“Welfare Reform,” 5:2 (2007)

“Model Minority Myth,” 6:1 (2008)

“Aging,” 6:2 (2008)

“K-12 Education” 7:1 (2009)

“Higher Education” 7:2 (2009)

“Intersections of Education” 8:1 (2010)

“Mental Health” 8:2 (2010)

“Forging the Future” 9:1&2 (2011)

“Special Issue on Immigration” 10:1 (2012)


“Special Issue on Asian Americans in Global Cities: Los Angeles – New York Connections and Comparisons” 10:2 (2012)


“Special Issue on Asian American & Pacific Islander Environmentalism: Expansions, Connections, & Social Change” 11:1 & 2 (2013)

“Special Issue on Asian American, Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander Communities and Federally Qualified Health Centers” 12:1-2 (2014)

“Special Issue on Wealth Inequality and Asian American Pacific Islanders” 13:1 & 2 (2015)

“Special Issue on AAPIs 2040” 14:1 (Spring 2016)

“Special Issue on AAPIs 2040” 14:2 (Fall 2016)

Press Release: The Mental Health Issue

UCLA releases AAPI Nexus Journal Special Issue on Mental Health

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 15, 2011

Editorial contact: Melany Dela Cruz-Viesca, melanyd@ucla.edu, 310-825-2974
Review copies: aascpress@aasc.ucla.edu, 310-825-2968

Los Angeles – The UCLA Asian American Studies Center announces the publication of Asian American Pacific Islander Nexus Journal: Policy, Practice and Community Special Issue on Mental Health. This issue features select papers presented at the first “State of AAPI Mental Health” conference held in 2010, which was a transdisciplinary gathering on mental health research, treatment, and practice among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs). The release of the Special Issue on Mental Health is in conjunction with the second conference on Friday, April 22, 2011. For more information on the conference, please visit: http://www.aasc.ucla.edu/aapimh/index.html.

The goals of the two conferences and this special issue are to increase the understanding about mental health and service needs of AAPIs. Research has shown that AAPIs have unique economic, linguistic, and cultural characteristics that require specific mental health services that can adequately address their needs. This issue on Mental Health highlights some of the emerging research for AAPIs with topics ranging from current policies, new research paradigms, to personal and cultural roadblocks in relation to mental health.

Contextualizing the challenges of addressing AAPI mental health, guest editors, Gilbert C. Gee (UCLA), Phillip D. Akutsu (CSU Sacramento), and Margaret Shih (UCLA), in their introduction illustrate how cultural, historical, and community diversity have led to underutilization of services and a lack of data. They call for new research that seriously considers the theories related to differences among diverse AAPI populations.

Marguerite Ro and Wendy Ho then provide an overview of the current California and Federal policies and legislation related to mental health in “Aligning Policy to the Mental Health Needs of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders.” The authors propose recommendations on how to better address issues of data and research, culturally competent services, and accountability of existing policies.

Frederick T.L. Leong and Zornitsa Kalibatseva, in “Comparative Effectiveness Research on Asian American Mental Health: Review and Recommendations,” provide an overview of the latest research paradigm called comparative effectiveness research (CER), which evaluates the efficacy of one or more interventions for a specific group. The authors urge researchers to use CER methods in order to stimulate more funding and foster a research environment that is responsive to the various issues in AAPI communities.

In the third manuscript, Phillip Akutsu and his colleagues discuss the issue of clients not showing up to their initial appointment to see a mental health provider in “Pre-Intake Attrition or Non-Attendance of Intake Appointments at an Ethnic-Specific Mental Health Program for Asian American Children and Adolescents.” Their findings show that key factors in motivating attendance involve matching the client’s language and ethnicity with the provider as well as fostering a personal connection between the provider and the client.

Van M. Ta et al. provide an ethnographic study in “Cultural Identity and Conceptualization of Depression among Native Hawaiian Women.” The authors seek to understand the correlation between cultural identity and depression among Native Hawaiian women. Their study across various age groups suggests that stressors resulting from U.S. occupation of Hawai’i such as acculturation, oppression, marginalization, and financial difficulties are important factors related to depression.

The issue closes with a non-theme article by Paul Ong and Albert Lee entitled, “Asian Americans and Redistricting: Empowering through Electoral Boundaries.” The authors contextualize the difficulties of building “communities of common interest” which ultimately helps preserve Asian American neighborhoods. They advocate for the need to bridge gaps and form coalitions to foster political empowerment for the AAPI community.

AAPI Nexus copies are $13.00 plus $4.00 for shipping and handling and 8.25% sales tax for California residents. Visit http://www.aasc.ucla.edu/aascpress/nexuscollection.asp for a complete list of AAPI Nexus Issue abstracts and messages from the editors. Make checks payable to “Regents of U.C.” VISA, MASTERCARD, and DISCOVER are also accepted; include expiration date and phone number on correspondence. The mailing address is: UCLA Asian American Studies Center Press, 3230 Campbell Hall, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1546. Phone: 310-825-2968. Email: aascpress@aasc.ucla.edu

Annual subscriptions for APPI Nexus are $35.00 for individuals and $175.00 for libraries and other institutions. AAPI Nexus is published twice a year: Spring and Fall.

Press Release: The Intersections of Education Issue

AAPI Nexus Journal Releases Special Issue on “Praxis and Power in the Intersections of Education”

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 8, 2010

Editorial contact: Melany Dela Cruz-Viesca, melanyd@ucla.edu, 310-825-2974
Review copies: aascpress@aasc.ucla.edu, 310-825-2968

Los Angeles—AAPI Nexus Journal has released its final issue of the special three-part series focusing on education. In this issue, guest editors Allyson Tintiangco-Cubales, Peter Nien-chu Kiang, and Samuel D. Museus present a series of articles that urge researchers, policy-makers, and practitioners to connect their work more intentionally across the domains of K-12 and higher education in order to have impact on a range of critical educational issues in AAPI communities. According to the editors, “When the roads of K-12 schooling and higher education converge…we discover glimpses of possibility for improvements in access, retention, and curricular matters.”

Shirley Hune and Jeomja Yeo open this issue with a study of the demographics and educational characteristics of Samoan students in Washington State public schools. Through the examination of statewide and district-level data, they find that Samoan students are at lower levels of performance and school engagement due to their school climates, generational conflicts, and other obstacles in their educational experiences.

Language barriers represent serious obstacles that limit access to higher education for many students from racial and ethnic minority backgrounds. Yang Sao Xiong’s study examines how state-mandated classification, testing, and tracking might limit language access to college-preparatory curricula specifically for Hmong American students in California. Through the analysis of interviews, Xiong also investigates Hmong American high school and college students’ perceptions about their college-going preparation.

Using national data, Yingyi Ma finds that Asian Americans have the highest expectations to major in natural science and engineering, as well as the highest rates of persistence in those fields. However, she argues that these students’ choices to enter the science and engineering fields are a result of being disadvantaged by their relative lack of cultural capital compared to other racial groups. Ma also describes how Asian American students tend to formulate negative self-perceptions towards the STEM fields of study.

In their practitioners’ essay, Allyson Tintiangco-Cubales, Roderick Daus-Magbual, and Arlene Daus-Magbual share the history and growth of Pin@y Educational Partnerships (PEP), a collaborative teacher pipeline from kindergarten to the doctoral level that can serve as a model for developing partnerships between schools, universities, and communities. They describe the programmatic and pedagogical development of PEP, including how it has been able to “grow” its own social justice educators and provide a more critical and socially engaged education for all of its students.

*Get the three-part series on education for a special price of 3 for *$30!* For more details, see our promo flyer. AAPI Nexus copies are $13.00 plus $4.00 for shipping and handling, and 9.75% sales tax for California residents. Make checks payable to “UC Regents.” VISA, MASTERCARD, and DISCOVER are also accepted; include expiration date and phone number on
correspondence. The mailing address is: UCLA Asian American Studies Center Press, 3230 Campbell Hall, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1546. Phone: 310-825-2968. Email: aascpress@aasc.ucla.edu. Annual subscriptions for AAPI Nexus are $35.00 for individuals and $175.00 for libraries and other institutions. AAPI Nexus is published twice a year: Winter/Spring, and Summer/Fall.

Press Release: The Higher Education Issue

AAPI NEXUS Journal Releases Special Issue on Asian American and Pacific Islander Higher Education

For Immediate Release
August 4, 2010

Editorial contact: Melany Dela Cruz-Viesca, melanyd@ucla.edu, 310-825-2974
Review copies: aascpress@aasc.ucla.edu, 310-825-2968

* *

AAPI Nexus Journal Releases Special Issue on Asian American and Pacific Islander Higher Education

Los Angeles – AAPI Nexus Journal has released its second issue of a three part education series, focusing on Higher Education.  Guest editors Mitchell J. Chang (UCLA) and Peter Nien-chu Kiang (University of Massachusetts Boston) have assembled articles that expand the horizon of Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) educational research in exciting ways that extend beyond well-trotted model minority paradigms. The articles in this issue discuss not only the many challenges that AAPI college students face, but also potential solutions that have implications for future generations of AAPI college students.

Ling-chi Wang writes of the struggles that community members in San Francisco faced for nearly thirty years to establish a Chinatown campus of the City College of San Francisco.  Wang emphasizes the roles of neighborhood demographics and political alliances that affect the construction of community colleges for AAPIs.

Rick Wagoner and Anthony Lin document issues and events that deal with Southeast Asian American community college students who transfer to four-year institutions.  They show how state- and federal-level policies are neglecting to acknowledge the disadvantages that Southeast Asian students encounter in community colleges, such as inadequate mentorship and programs, which have a negative impact on their transition into a four-year university.

Next, Jillian Liesemeyer finds a significant parallel between the historical trends of exclusionary quotas against Jewish students in American universities and the contemporary controversy over Asian American student enrollment in higher education.  Liesemeyer highlights the responses of students and university administrators to these issues that had been largely publicized and debated in newspapers and articles.  By understanding the similarities in these two cases, Liesemeyer hopes that policymakers can better confront the exclusionary practices against Asian Americans.

Similarly, Oiyan Poon examines the recent policy changes in eligibility of admissions in the University of California system. In her article, Poon concludes by proposing a national research-based education organization to facilitate communication among educators, students, and community and institutional leaders in order to develop an education policy agenda based on community interests and research and to help advocate more effectively for Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders.

Julie Park and Mitchell Chang close this second issue by providing insights into the development of legislation for the federal designation of AAPI-serving institutions. They document the experiences of policy makers, congressional staffers, and community advocates, with an eye toward improving the future influence of AAPI communities on educational matters.

AAPI Nexus copies are $13.00 plus $4.00 for shipping and handling, and 9.75% sales tax for California residents. Make checks payable to “UC Regents.” VISA, MASTERCARD, and DISCOVER are also accepted; include expiration date and phone number on correspondence. The mailing address is: UCLA Asian American Studies Center Press, 3230 Campbell Hall, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1546. Phone: 310-825-2968. Email: aascpress@aasc.ucla.edu

Annual subscriptions for AAPI Nexus are $35.00 for individuals and $175.00 for libraries and other institutions. AAPI Nexus is published twice a year: Winter/Spring, and Summer/Fall.

Press Release: The K-12 Education Issue

UCLA releases AAPI Nexus Journal Special Issue on K-12 Education

Melany Dela Cruz-Viesca, melanyd@ucla.edu
For Immediate Use
(310) 206-7738

Los Angeles – As guest editors Peter Nien-chu Kiang (University of Massachusetts Boston) and Mitchell J. Chang (UCLA) write, “Asian American and Pacific Islander communities have individually and collectively invested enormous trust in US educational institutions on behalf of themselves and their children.” Nexus will release three new issues on education, the first of which will focus on K-12 Education. With significant economic struggles and budget cuts in this new decade, these issues will help to inform the education policies and changing AAPI populations.

Patricia Espiritu Halagao, Allyson Tintiangco-Cubales, and Joan May T. Cordova contributed a resource article that evaluates thirty-three examples of curricular resources by Filipina/o American educators during the past forty years in terms of critical content, instruction, and impact. Practitioners involved with school- and community-based curriculum development centered on the voices and experiences of ethnic-specific groups will want to consider the authors’ criterion-based critical review framework for their own purposes.

Next, Leena Her’s research article looks at the educational conditions facing English Learners within an urban California high school through an eighteen-month ethnography. Her analyzes how teachers and administrators “explain failure” within the school, particularly in relation to English learners, and shows how discourse, educational practice, and local/national assessment policies intersect with various day-to-day challenges facing English Learners and Hmong American students in low-performing schools.

Valerie Ooka Pang then describes how Asian American teacher beliefs and practices “explain success” in an urban California elementary school with similarly large numbers of Asian American and Latino students. Through interviews and observations, Pang finds that the effective Asian American teachers combine ethics of caring with culturally responsive instructional practices and dedicated attention to curricular content that align carefully with state and district standards.

Phitsamay Sychitkokhong Uy looks at Vietnamese and Chinese American high school students in an East Coast school district and how ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and gender are associated with these students dropping out of school. With the interplay between these factors, Sychitkokhong Uy finds that low-income Chinese and Vietnamese students that are boys have a harder time to graduate in 4 years; Chinese students also had higher odds of dropping out within four years in comparison to Vietnamese peers.

Jean Ryoo next provides a comprehensive review of the historically significant Asian Movement newspaper, Gidra (1969-1974), and how specific coverage of education and youth issues in Gidra during that time period reflect on contemporary AAPI educational issues. Ryoo offers lessons from Gidra about community organizing, activism, and documentation for readers today.

Finally, former bilingual teacher Lusa Lo contributes a practitioner’s essay on the problems with translating Individual Education Programs (IEPs) from English to Chinese for children with disabilities whose families do not read or speak English. Lo’s analysis reveals the critical need for trained bilingual practitioners to play greater roles in all aspects of special education services. Lo also argues for more studies to address other AAPI groups who also have disabilities combined with specific linguistic and cultural profiles.

AAPI Nexus copies are $13.00 plus $4.00 for shipping and handling and 8.75% sales tax for California residents. Make checks payable to “Regents of U.C.” VISA, MASTERCARD, and DISCOVER are also accepted; include expiration date and phone number on correspondence. The mailing address is: UCLA Asian American Studies Center Press, 3230 Campbell Hall, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1546. Phone: 310-825-2968. Email: aascpress@aasc.ucla.edu

Annual subscriptions for AAPI Nexus are $35.00 for individuals and $175.00 for libraries and other institutions. AAPI Nexus is published twice a year: Winter/Spring, and Summer/Fall.

Press Release: The Aging issue

UCLA releases AAPI Nexus Journal Special Issue on Aging

Melany Dela Cruz-Viesca, melanyd@ucla.edu
For Immediate Use
(310) 206-7738

Los Angeles – The UCLA Asian American Studies Center released its newest issue of Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) Nexus Journal: Policy, Practice and Community focused on “Aging in Asian American and Pacific Islander communities,” guest edited by Dr. Namkee G. Choi (U.T. Austin) and Dr. Jim Lubben (Boston College). With an ever growing number of older AAPIs, these older adults face additional challenges such as higher poverty rates among all older adults in the United States, lower rates of having private insurance, and many unmet mental health needs. Moreover, with the wide heterogeneity among AAPI older adults, it is more difficult to generalize study findings to all AAPI elders. However, there is a clear need for more research that can help address this population’s challenges.

The practitioners essay by Herb Shon and Ailee Moon describes the outreach and implementation of an education program for an ethnic-specific caregiver group in “A Model for Developing and Implementing a Theory-Driven, Culture-Specific Outreach and Education Program for Korean American Caregivers of People with Alzheimer’s Disease.” Because AAPI caregivers oftentimes struggle with cultural and structural barriers in accessing services, the authors model how a culturally relevant outreach program can benefit caregivers who are themselves immigrants.

Jong Won Min and colleagues, in “Health of Older Asian Americans in California: Findings from California Health Interview Survey,” explore subgroup differences in socioeconomic health factors among Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean and Vietnamese elders, which fare less favorably than Non-Hispanic White counterparts. With the significant differences between these populations, the authors provide insight into a range of characteristics that demonstrate the complexity within older Asian American populations.

In the manuscript by Poorni G. Otilingam and Margaret Gatz, the authors are the first to explore “Perceptions of Dementia among Asian Indian Americans.” This significant study describes their perceptions of etiology, help-seeking, treatment, and knowledge of Alzheimer’s disease. Some of their findings call for a need for more public education about Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, especially for Asian Indian Americans.

The resource paper by Sela V. Panapasa and colleagues, “Economic Hardship among Elderly Pacific Islanders,” provides a rare look at the economic status of Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander elders. The findings help inform policies that need to account for in-group heterogeneity among these minority populations with high poverty and unmet social service needs. Because of the challenges that aging populations pose to social policy, these papers help shape future culturally sensitive programs and services to AAPI elders and families.

AAPI Nexus copies are $13.00 plus $4.00 for shipping and handling and 8.75% sales tax for California residents. Make checks payable to “Regents of U.C.” VISA, MASTERCARD, and DISCOVER are also accepted; include expiration date and phone number on correspondence. The mailing address is: UCLA Asian American Studies Center Press, 3230 Campbell Hall, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1546. Phone: 310-825-2968. Email: aascpress@aasc.ucla.edu

Annual subscriptions for APPI Nexus are $35.00 for individuals and $175.00 for libraries and other institutions. AAPI Nexus is published twice a year: Winter/Spring, and Summer/Fall.

Press Release: Model Minority Myth

New issue of UCLA’s AAPI Nexus explores the other side of model minority myth with new Senior Editor

May 24, 2009
Melany Dela Cruz-Viesca, melanyd@ucla.edu
For Immediate Use
(310) 206-7738

The Asian American Pacific Islander Nexus Journal: Policy, Practice and Community (AAPI Nexus) is pleased to announce its newest Senior Editor, Professor Marjorie Kagawa-Singer of Community Health Sciences at the UCLA School of Public Health. In Kagawa-Singer’s first special issue, vol. 6.1, the journal presents five articles that explore the diversity within these communities, including the disparities that continue to mark some of their experiences. The issue begins with the inaugural note from Kagawa-Singer that highlights a new vision for the journal, which works to bring visibility and attention to marginalized experiences within the Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander populations through research and policy.

Paul M. Ong, Melany dela Cruz-Viesca, and Don T. Nakanishi explore in the first article how to provide these communities with agency through voting. In discussing the potential political power of the AA/NH/PI population, Ong et al. provide insight into how to create policy changes that can benefit these communities.

This issue also explores three pervasive difficulties that challenge the model minority myth, including:

Su Yeong Kim and colleagues, in “‘It’s like we’re just renting from here’: The Pervasive Experiences of Discrimination of Filipino Immigrant Youth Gang Members in Hawai’i,” which examines these youth gang members and their challenges in Hawai’i. This piece also includes avenues to help with intervention for these youth who join gangs in order to have agency and protection from discrimination.

Robyn Greenfield Matloff et al. explore in “The Obesity Epidemic in Chinese American Youth?: A Literature Review and Pilot Study” Chinese American youth and possible risk factors for the growing epidemic of obesity in Boston’s Chinatown. The study also discusses the role of acculturation and changing lifestyles that result from immigration experiences.

Jeanne Shimatsu and colleagues include data about the rates of alcohol use and risky sexual behaviors with their piece, “Sex and Alcohol on the College Campus: An Assessment of HIV-Risk Behaviors among AAPI College Students.” This paper also includes ways that can help intervene and address the alarmingly high number of unprotected sex and alcohol use found in their study.

These articles address the diversity within the AAPI communities that are often dismissed due to the model minority myth. These informative pieces help to develop new ways to intervene and prevent other pervasive problems from increasing in these communities.

AAPI Nexus copies are $13.00 plus $4.00 for shipping and handling and 8.75% sales tax for California residents. Make checks payable to “Regents of U.C.” VISA, MASTERCARD, and DISCOVER are also accepted; include expiration date and phone number on correspondence. The mailing address is: UCLA Asian American Studies Center Press, 3230 Campbell Hall, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1546. Phone: 310-825-2968. Email: aascpress@aasc.ucla.edu

Annual subscriptions for APPI Nexus are $35.00 for individuals and $175.00 for libraries and other institutions. AAPI Nexus is published twice a year: Winter/Spring, and Summer/Fall.

Press Release: Welfare Reform

New Issue of AAPI Nexus Features Research on Impact of Welfare Reform on Asian Americans

February 5, 2008
Melany Dela Cruz-Viesca, melanyd@ucla.edu
For Immediate Use
(310) 206-7738

“A Commitment to Building Bridges”

AAPI Nexus Features Research on Impact of Welfare Reform on Asian Americans

UCLA Asian American Studies Center-As a group, Asian Americans are often lauded for their academic and economic success. This stereotype, however, obscures how this population’s needs and interests continue to remain unaddressed in public policy, both at local and state levels. The current issue of AAPI Nexus (5:2) features research on how Asian American communities are affected by and respond to policies related to welfare reform, healthcare, education, and art/cultural institutions.

The passage of the 1996 Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act dramatically transformed public assistance into a welfare-to-work program, with time limits on benefits. Julian Chow et al., in their article “Welfare Reform and the Delivery of Welfare-to-Work Programs to AAPIs,” investigated the welfare timed-out rates among AAPIs in California. The authors thus recommend that strategies like job programs and comprehensive, family-focused services will help AAPIs address the numerous cultural and linguistic barriers they face in transitioning to work. “Engaging the communities and families in which AAPI welfare recipients belong,” state the authors, “is an effective way to encourage participation and on-going communication.”

Evelyn Blumenberg et al.’s article, “Surveying Southeast Asian Welfare Recipients,” further notes the challenge of collecting survey data on AAPIs, due to inadequate funding, the lack of survey materials in Asian languages, and the additional administrative costs. The authors hope that these strategies “will contribute to a better understanding of the welfare dynamics of Southeast Asians and to the development of policies and programs to engender economic self-sufficiency among this disadvantaged population group.”

Other articles in this issue also delve into AAPI responses to issues in their community. Linda Vo, in “Whose School District Is This,” discusses the Orange County Vietnamese American community’s efforts to reinstate a job offer to Dr. KimOanh Nguyen-Lam as the school supervisor in a district with a large Latino and Vietnamese population. Nguyen-Lam noted that this diversity results in opportunities “to learn from and work with professionals and activists from diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds. . .who share a similar passion and commitment to social justice.” This campaign highlighted the need to build coalitions within the Vietnamese community and create multiracial alliances with the Latino community, ones that the article states are crucial to sustaining momentum in such mobilization efforts.

Like schools, cultural institutions such as museums can reflect the development of a region’s pan-ethnic Asian Pacific American identity. In “From Merging Histories to Emerging Identities: An ‘Asian’ Museum as a Site of Pan-ethnic Identity Promotion,” Chong-suk Han and Edward Echtle explore how the Wing Luke Asian Museum (WLAM) in Seattle, Washington acts as a site where pan-ethnic Asian American identity can be promoted. The authors note that the WLAM provides a setting in the Pacific Northwest “for persons of diverse Asian backgrounds to establish social ties and to discuss their common problems and experiences.”

Community-based organizations could also play an important role in state efforts to cope with emerging health threats such as SARS and AIDS, say Lois M. Takahashi and Michelle G. Magalong in their article “Building Community Capacity for Rapid Response to State Health Crises.” They find significant gaps in rapid and effective communication with the state’s large and growing immigrant population. The authors recommend that AAPI organizations could be incorporated into state health emergency planning and program implementation to ensure that “health emergency planning and program implementation will ensure that hard-to-reach individuals, households, and communities will be informed and educated in a timely manner.”

According to outgoing Senior Editor Paul Ong, a common thread among these articles is the commitment to building bridges between the university, AAPI communities, and the larger society. Ong will step down as Nexus Senior Editor with this issue, to assume the directorship of the AAPI Policy Multi-Campus Research Program (MRP) within the University of California. Starting 2008, Professor Marjorie Kagawa-Singer will serve as the new Nexus senior editor.

AAPI Nexus copies are $13.00 plus $4.00 for shipping and handling and 8.75% sales tax for California residents. Make checks payable to “Regents of U.C.” VISA, MASTERCARD, and DISCOVER are also accepted; include expiration date and phone number on correspondence. The mailing address is: UCLA Asian American Studies Center Press, 3230 Campbell Hall, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1546. Phone: 310-825-2968. Email: aascpress@aasc.ucla.edu 

Annual subscriptions for AAPI Nexus are $35.00 for individuals and $175.00 for libraries and other institutions. AAPI Nexus is published twice a year: Winter/Spring, and Summer/Fall.

Press Release: Art and Cultural Institutions

New issue of UCLA’s AAPI Nexus explores Art and Cultural Institutions

Melany Dela Cruz-Viesca, melanyd@ucla.edu
For Immediate Use
(310) 206-7738

UCLA Asian American Studies Center- From Sandra Oh of Grey’s Anatomy to American Idol’s Sanjaya, there has been an increase in the presence of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) in popular media. Unfortunately, popular images of AAPIs have been based on simplistic stereotypes of perpetual foreigners or disease-bearing poor or unfair competitors in the marketplace or “model minorities,” images that have had serious negative implications for AAPI communities. Building on the celebration of Asia Pacific American Heritage Month last May, the current issue of AAPI Nexus (5:1) entitled “AAPIs and Cultural Institutions,” features how organizations like museums, traveling exhibits, performance troupes, and libraries represent AAPI communities and their diverse experiences.

“The struggle to make cultural institutions more representative and accountable is part and parcel of the larger struggle by people of color and their allies for equality and justice,” write the issue co-editors Paul Ong of UCLA and Franklin Odo, the Director of the Smithsonian Institution’s Asian Pacific American Program. In the early years, activist AAPIs lobbied for change from the outside, participating in protest politics against mainstream institutions. More recently, however, “they have worked their way into the “belly of the beast” and equally important have established parallel and counter organizations.”

In the article “The Challenges of Displaying Asian America,” art historian ShiPu Wang writes from a curator’s point of view, examining the obstacles and reasons behind the lack of exhibitions of AAPI works in the United States, such as conservation issues and problems in finding lost works in the first place. This is especially true of pre-World War II artists like Lewis Suzuki, whose graphics carried unwavering pro-labor, pro-equality messages and Filipino American painter Carlos Maganti Tagaroma Carvajal, whose work challenged the marriage of Catholicism and European/American Imperialism and its impact on powerless people.

The article “Libraries as Contested Community and Cultural Space” by Clara Chu and Todd Honma explored how the Bruggemeyer Memorial Library in Monterey Park, CA became a battleground to reclaim “community, access, and representation of Asian Americans.” In the mid-1980s, many long-time residents of the city grew alarmed at the increase of Chinese immigrants. The hostility of English language-only advocates spilled towards library policies, as the Bruggemeyer Library began to carry more foreign language books to meet the needs of its changing demographics.

Although the Monterey Park community has moved on, the issue resurfaced again two years ago over a proposed reveals unresolved issues regarding community identity. Chu and Honma’s article shows how ethnic communities such as Asian Americans can “effectively wield political power to claim a rightful civic space.”

While many of these cultural institutions are located in cities with large AAPI populations,
John P. Rosa, in his article “Small Numbers/Big City: Innovative Presentations of Pacific Islander Art and Culture in Arizona,” examines how the small but growing community in Phoenix, AZ has sustained, developed, and preserved its culture and art in the absence of permanent cultural museums. Phoenix community groups use small, temporary displays at annual AAPI cultural festivals. One approach is a “museum on wheels”-a used tour bus filled with certified reproductions of artifacts on loan from the Bishop Museum in Honolulu. The annual Arizona Aloha Festival also features performances from Tongan choirs based in Tempe as well as ki ho`alu (slack key guitar) artist and Phoenix resident Dana “Moon” Kahele. A quilting group and a canoe-paddling club are further activities that let AAPIs share the “Aloha spirit” with their fellow residents.

Together, the articles in this issue show how AAPI concerns have become more accepted by cultural institutions, ethnic organizations have become more institutionalized, and AAPI activists have become more professionalized. However, editors Ong and Ono warn of a potential downside, of resting on the laurels of these successes.

“Incorporation of AAPIs individually and organizationally by this nation’s cultural sector can lead to political complacency and isolation from the broader social movement long before the ultimate goals are achieved,” the editors write. “The larger challenge before us, then, is renewing the passion for progressive social change.”

AAPI Nexus copies are $13.00 plus $4.00 for shipping and handling and 8.75% sales tax for California residents. Make checks payable to “Regents of U.C.” VISA, MASTERCARD, and DISCOVER are also accepted; include expiration date and phone number on correspondence. The mailing address is: UCLA Asian American Studies Center Press, 3230 Campbell Hall, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1546. Phone: 310-825-2968. Email: aascpress@aasc.ucla.edu

Annual subscriptions for APPI Nexus are $35.00 for individuals and $175.00 for libraries and other institutions. AAPI Nexus is published twice a year: Winter/Spring, and Summer/Fall.

Press Release: Special Focus on Youth Facing Risks

UCLA: New Issue of AAPI Nexus on “Beyond the ‘Whiz Kid’ Stereotype: New Research on Asian American and Pacific Islander Youth”

Melany Dela Cruz-Viesca, melanyd@ucla.edu
For Immediate Use
(310) 206-7738
November 30, 2006

Beyond the ‘Whiz Kid’ Stereotype:
New Research on Asian American and Pacific Islander Youth

UCLA Asian American Studies Center – Asian American youth are often portrayed as obedient whiz kids who excel academically. This simplistic picture, however, ignores the increasing number of Asian American and Pacific Islander youth who are struggling with school and the juvenile justice system. The current issue of AAPI Nexus (4:2), entitled “Youth Facing Risks,” features new research on youth violence, delinquency and other risk factors facing Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) youth.

While much research has gone into youth violence in the United States, observes guest editor Karen Umemoto, Professor of Urban Planning at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, little is known about AAPI youth.
However, she says, “the available information shows that certain groups face serious problems.”

Samoan youth in Hawai`i, for example, report higher rates on indicators of high-risk behavior, including weapons possession, involvement in physical fights and substance abuse. In the article “You got to do so much to actually make it,” researchers David Tokiharu Mayeda, Lisa Pasko and Meda Chesney-Lind point to factors such as unequal gender roles, biases in schools and the lack of positive role models as critical issues for Samoan youth.

The article “Profiling Incarcerated Asian and Pacific Islander Youth” by Isami Arifuku, Delores D. Peacock and Caroline Glesmann further examines AAPI juvenile crime, with a focus on California. While AAPIs constitute only 5 percent of incarcerated youth in the state, the authors found that some ethnicities were overrepresented in the California juvenile justice system. These overrepresented ethnicities, note the authors, comprise groups that immigrated into the U.S. after the mid-1970s.

These demographic differences, writes Umemoto, illustrate the importance of “designing culturally appropriate prevention and intervention strategies.” Unfortunately, she continues, most of the policies that aim to curb violence and delinquency “lack grounded understandings of the problem.”

The article “Self-Reported Rates and Risk Factors of Cambodian, Chinese, Lao/Mien and Vietnamese Youth” by Thao N. Le and Judy L. Wallen contributes to this understanding by exploring the factors that place this population at risk for serious violence. Risk factors include difficulties in acculturation, second-generation status, and inconsistent parental supervision and discipline.

Ahn-Luu T. Huynh-Hohnbaum further emphasizes the importance of the home environment in “The Role of the Family in Asian American Delinquency.” She finds that family structure was a predictive factor for AAPI involvement in juvenile delinquency. Parental monitoring, in particular, served to protect youth from involvement in delinquent acts against persons and property.

To date, however, the few policies aimed at addressing issues of AAPI juvenile crime neglect these important cultural factors. Such misdirected policies are discussed in the article “Asian Americans on the Streets” by James Diego Vigil, Tomson H. Nguyen, and Jesse Cheng. Focusing on Vietnamese and Cambodian youth gangs in California, the authors propose prevention and intervention strategies that involve the community and schools.

“Policies (should) take into account the nuanced differences between Asian communities,” write the authors. These include, for example, culturally different parenting and communication styles and the availability of various social institutions within the ethnic communities.

Together, the articles in this special issue of AAPI Nexus belie the simplistic “whiz kid” stereotypes. “These articles,” says Umemoto, “contribute to the critical conversation on the risks, challenges, and opportunities facing AAPI youth.”

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